Guide to the Temple of Hephaestus: Info, History & Tickets

Aktualisiert am 27. February 2023 von Athens-Tourist-Information
Temple of Hephaistos Athens Tourist Information

Probably the best preserved temple in Greece rises on a hill on the western edge of the ancient Agora, the Temple of Hephaestus.

In this complete guide to the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, you'll learn all about the ancient site, its history, and helpful information about how to get there, tours, and tickets.

What Can I Do at the Temple of Hephaestus?

Temple of Hephaestos with Green Grass Athens Tourist Information

The Temple of Hephaestus in the heart of Athens is one of the best-preserved monuments from antiquity and one of the most important sights in Athens.

You can be taken back to antiquity by viewing the magnificent temple. Dedicated to the Greek god of blacksmithing, the 5th-century BC marble temple is 32 meters long. In addition to the roof, the marble columns have also been preserved.

You can admire the rich sculptural decoration of the Doric temple in detail. On the front façade are the metopes depicting the exploits of Heracles, while the sides tell of the exploits of Theseus.

On the inner walls of the temple you can discover an intricate frieze depicting mythological scenes of battles against centaurs and other creatures. Occasionally you can even spot the traces of paint that once decorated the depictions.  

Several panels provide information in English and Greek about the history and architecture of the ancient monument.

The Roman Agora and many other sights are also located on the extensive area of the ancient Agora. Find out more in our guide to the Agora of Athens.

Admission, Tickets and Guided Tours

  • Admission: Children under the age of 5, EU citizens under the age of 25 and visitors with disabilities are admitted free. A detailed list is available here.
  • Tickets: Admission to the Temple of Hephaestus is included in the Agora ticket. Online skip-the-line tickets for Agora of Athens are available in our ticket shop.
  • Combo Ticket: There is a combo ticket that is valid for 5 days and includes entry to the Temple of Hephaestus. It also offers access to the following museums and sites: Acropolis, Ancient Agora, Museum of Ancient Agora, Archaeological Museum of Kerameikos, Hadrian's Library, Kerameikos, Archaeological Site of Lykeion, North Slope of Acropolis, Olympieion, Roman Agora of Athens, South Slope of Acropolis. It is available in our shop.
  • Guided Tours:  Guided tours that take you through ancient Athens and visit historical sites such as the Ancient Agora, Acropolis and Olympieion can be purchased from our ticket shop.
  • Tip: Admission is free on the first Sunday of every month (November to March). Also on March 6th, April 18th, May 18th, October 28th and the last weekend of September.
Temple of Hephaestos Side View Athens Tourist Information

How Do I Get to the Temple of Hephaestus?

The Temple of Hephaestus is located in the center of Athens. It lies on a hill on the western edge of the ancient agora. It can be reached on foot from Monastiraki Square as well as from the Acropolis.

Since the metro station "Monastiraki" is only a 7-minute walk from the Temple of Hephaestus, it is advisable to use public transport (Metro 1 or 3). 

Cruise passengers arriving from Piraeus Port can go to the nearby Piraeus Metro Station and board the M1 line. A single ticket is sufficient for the 16-minute journey to Monastiraki station.

FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

What are the opening hours of the Temple of Hephaestus?

The current opening hours of the Temple of Hephaestus can be found here.

Where is the Temple of Hephaestus?

The Temple of Hephaestus stands on the Kolonos Agoraios, a small hill in the Agora area in the center of Athens. The address is: Adrianou 24, 10555 Athens, Greece

How do I get to the Temple of Hephaestus?

The Temple of Hephaestus is within walking distance from the Acropolis and Monastiraki Square. Those arriving by public transport are best off taking metro line 1 or 3, as the Monastiraki metro station is only a 7-minute walk from the temple.

Visitors arriving from the Piraeus cruise port can go to the nearby Piraeus Metro Station and board the M1 line. A single ticket is sufficient for the 16-minute journey to Monastiraki station.

Where can I buy tickets for the Temple of Hephaestus?

Entry to the Temple of Hephaestus is included in the Ancient Agora ticket. Tickets are available on site at the ticket counters and online in our ticket shop. You can choose between Agora skip-the-line tickets and a combination ticket that includes entry to several ancient sites such as the Acropolis and the Olympieion.

Temple of Hephaestos Roof Details Athens Tourist Information

History of the Temple of Hephaestus

The Temple of Hephaestus was probably built between 421 and 415 BC. It is made of marble from the quarries of Mount Pendeli.

The temple is also known as Thission, which is why it was thought for a time that it was dedicated to Theseus. However, scientists assume that this naming is due to the scenes that decorate the sides of the building and show the deeds of Theseus. Rather, the Temple of Hephaestus was built in honor of Hephaestus, Greek god of fire and blacksmithing, and the goddess Athena, protector of crafts.

The temple survived the invasion of the Germanic Heruli tribe unscathed and was converted into a church dedicated to Saint George Akamas in the 7th century AD.

The Greek Orthodox Church remained faithful to this function until the end of Ottoman rule in Greece. After the Greek War of Independence (1821-1829), a mass was held here to welcome King Otto I, the first king of Greece. For the next few decades, the temple was used as an archaeological museum, until extensive excavation work on the area of the ancient Agora began in 1930.

Today the Temple of Hephaestus is one of the most important monuments in Athens.

Contact

  • Address:  Adrianou 24, 10555 Athens, Greece
  • Opening Times You can find the current opening times here
  • Public Transport: Metro 1 or 3 to “Monastiraki”
  • Website:  odysseus.culture.gr

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